School candidates collect their certificates from their schools while private candidates obtain theirs directly from WAEC.

No. Instead it issues statements of result to the owners of lost certificates or, when necessary, confirms their results for a fee.

WAEC also issue attestation of result document for damaged and lost certificates.

Yes.

Candidates can collect their certificates from WAEC Zonal and Branch offices in charge of the state where they sat for the examination.

WAEC examiners are mostly graduate teachers in secondary schools, and some lecturers in colleges of education, universities and polytechnics. A prospective examiner must be a graduate in the subject he is appointed to mark. In addition, he must have a minimum of two years of classroom teaching experience and must be recommended by the principal of the school in which he teaches.

First, a committee of experts draws up a marking guide. All appointed examiners are then thoroughly drilled in all aspects of the marking scheme in a simulated marking exercise called co-ordination. Actual marking does not start until the coordinating officers are satisfied that all examiners know what is required of them. Even when actual marking begins, the examiners are not left entirely on their own.

They are organised into small groups, each being supervised by a highly experienced examiner called a Team Leader. The Team Leader checks and vets the group members' marking progressively to ensure that they are keeping to the guidelines.

The Team Leaders themselves are supervised by more experienced examiners called Chief Examiners. When marking is finally completed, WAEC still goes ahead to employ another group of people called Checkers. The main role of Checkers is to ensure that all marks awarded by examiners are correctly recorded and transferred to the appropriate score sheets.

No. The marking of scripts is handled by examiners appointed by WAEC. They are usually educationists who are familiar with the classroom situation and their identities are not supposed to be disclosed.

Candidates are required to enter and sit for a minimum of eight (8) and a maximum of nine (9) subjects. These must include the following :

  • English Language
  • Mathematics
  • At least one Nigerian Language (see footnote)
  • At least one of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
  • At least one of Literature-in-English, History and Geography.
  • Agricultural Science or at least one vocational subject.

These are the core subjects. In addition to the above, every student must offer any three of the underlisted subjects not already offered as core subjects: Biology, Economics, Physics, Book-Keeping, Chemistry, Typewriting, Further Mathematics, Shorthand, Commerce, History, Geography, Literature-in-English, Agricultural Science, Woodwork, Health Science, Auto-Mechanics, Building Construction, Music, Clothing and Textiles, Art, Christian Religious Knowledge, French, Islamic Studies, Physical Education, Arabic Studies, Government, Metal Work, Applied Electricity, Electronics, Foods and Nutrition, Technical Drawing Home Management.

NOTE: The Federal Ministry of Education has given a waiver in respect of Nigerian Languages during the 2003 examination. This implies that candidates' entries are valid with or without a Nigerian language for the period of the waiver.