Results are cancelled when candidates are found guilty of examination malpractice.

WAEC certificates have no expiry date.

No. Instead it issues statements of result to the owners of lost certificates or, when necessary, confirms their results for a fee.

WAEC also issue attestation of result document for damaged and lost certificates.

In the case of the school examination, the prospective candidate must be in the SS 3 class in a recognized school, For the private candidates' examination, any one of the following categories may enter for the WASSCE:

  1. Those who have attempted the WASSCE in previous years;
  2. Those who have attempted the GCE and obtained a pass in at least three subjects;
  3. Those who have passed the Teachers’ Grade two examination.

WAEC discourages direct communication with school candidates. School candidates are expected to send their complaints to WAEC through their school principals, while private candidates contact WAEC directly.

To cater for the needs of candidates and propective candidates alike, WAEC has created the following channels for candidate interaction;

  1. WAEC Konnect is a mini social media platform for recent WAEC candidates. Log on to https://waeckonnect.com
  2. For up-to-date practise questions visit our elearning platform here; http://e-learning.waecnigeria.com

Yes, but only if (s)he is a school candidate. No provision is made for a private candidate in this regard. Even then, a school candidate does not write directly to WAEC. It is her/his principal who, knowing the candidate's ability, forwards a request for the review of the candidate's scripts. Of course, there is a specified fee to be paid on every paper to be reviewed. Such requests should be sent in within sixty days of any examination.

No. The marking of scripts is handled by examiners appointed by WAEC. They are usually educationists who are familiar with the classroom situation and their identities are not supposed to be disclosed.

First, a committee of experts draws up a marking guide. All appointed examiners are then thoroughly drilled in all aspects of the marking scheme in a simulated marking exercise called co-ordination. Actual marking does not start until the coordinating officers are satisfied that all examiners know what is required of them. Even when actual marking begins, the examiners are not left entirely on their own.

They are organised into small groups, each being supervised by a highly experienced examiner called a Team Leader. The Team Leader checks and vets the group members' marking progressively to ensure that they are keeping to the guidelines.

The Team Leaders themselves are supervised by more experienced examiners called Chief Examiners. When marking is finally completed, WAEC still goes ahead to employ another group of people called Checkers. The main role of Checkers is to ensure that all marks awarded by examiners are correctly recorded and transferred to the appropriate score sheets.